Other Works

The assignment for this Digital Fibers class was to research a current event and transform it into a graphic representation through a repeat pattern and finally an upholstery application. The concept for this pattern is derived from researching Colony Collapse Disorder. An unknown phenomenon causing large populations of bees to abandon their hives and disappear. Amongst the motif are ghosted bees and the honeycomb type backdrop utilizes a mosaic pattern instead of the traditional hexagon found in nature. This pattern emits the sense of breakdown in structure occurring in the bee habitat.

This poster was the final product of an assignment to design a poster for a graduate student film entitled SEAM. This poster evokes the hardship felt by the protagonist, a Mexican immigrant, longing for her family back home. This poster was chosen by the director as one of two pieces to represent her film.

This poster is from a set of three and was designed for a competition to create a poster for the 3rd Annual Imperial Valley Film Festival. Billed as “the hottest film festival in the world,” film negatives were cut up and arranged in mosaic patterns to tie in the two central themes of the event.

This poster is from a set of three and was designed for a competition to create a poster for the 3rd Annual Imperial Valley Film Festival. Billed as “the hottest film festival in the world,” film negatives were cut up and arranged in mosaic patterns to tie in the two central themes of the event.

This poster is from a set of three and was designed for a competition to create a poster for the 3rd Annual Imperial Valley Film Festival. Billed as “the hottest film festival in the world,” film negatives were cut up and arranged in mosaic patterns to tie in the two central themes of the event.

These photographs were shot with a manual Konica Autorelex A and were then hand processed at the Miami Dade College color photography lab. No computer editing was done.

These photographs were shot with a manual Nikon FE-2 and were then hand processed at the Miami Dade College color photography lab. No computer editing was done.